Tivadar Csontváry Kosztka – Castellammare di Stabia (1902)

Today his name is largely unknown outside of Hungary, but Tivadar Csontváry Kosztka was actually rather good at promoting himself. In fact, if he were still alive today, he’d probably write a self-help book based on his life: “How to be an Artist – the Long and Winding Road”. Here’s the blueprint: ~ Have your…

Canaletto – Piazza San Marco (late 1720s)

By the 18th century, Italy had become a popular tourist destination for wealthy Europeans and Americans, a must see for those looking to expand their knowledge, culture and education. Because there was so much to be seen, foreigners would often end up spending years there, moving from city to city while following an established itinerary….

David Burliuk – Cyclamens (1954)

I often find myself underwhelmed by still life. I can understand its function – particularly for budding artists – as a test lab for experimenting with multiple perspectives or different applications of colors, of measuring angles, playing with negative spaces and looking for rapports between different objects. Emotionally, however, I am often completely detached when…

Antonio Donghi – The Juggler (1936)

Famous for his motionless paintings, Italian artist Antonio Donghi (1897 – 1963) was also known as the painter fleeing the wind. There is no movement suggested in Donghi’s paintings, as if time is standing still, his style being reminiscent of Henri Rousseau and Georges Seurat. The Italian was fascinated by the circus life and performers,…