Carpaccio – Preparation of Christ’s Tomb (1505)

Chances are you’ve probably heard of carpaccio – the Italian appetizer which consists of thinly sliced raw meat – but you might not know that the name was inspired by the Renaissance painter Vittore Carpaccio. According to anecdotes, when Giuseppe Cipriani – the owner of the renowned Venetian restaurant Harry’s Bar, frequented among others by…

Artemisia Gentileschi – Jael and Sisera (c. 1620)

The sight of a female painter in 17th century Italy must have been an absolute rarity, but Artemisia Gentileschi was lucky enough to be taught to paint in her father’s workshop. It was there where she also met Agostino Tassi, another artist that her father, Orazio Gentileschi, had hired to tutor her. One day Tassi…

Canaletto – Piazza San Marco (late 1720s)

By the 18th century, Italy had become a popular tourist destination for wealthy Europeans and Americans, a must see for those looking to expand their knowledge, culture and education. Because there was so much to be seen, foreigners would often end up spending years there, moving from city to city while following an established itinerary….

Cagnaccio di San Pietro – Zoologia (1928)

Cagnacico di San Pietro (1897 – 1946), born Natale Bentivoglio Scarpa, was an Italian magic realist painter, heavily influenced by the German movement called New Objectivity. His paintings have a photographic air about them, making them look highly contemporaneous. Zoologia (1928) is a classic example of the photorealistic style he employed. Even when showing erotic…