Mary Cassatt – In the Loge (1878)

When Countess Olenska appeared in the box of one of New York’s oldest aristocratic families one January night in the 1870s, a wave of indignation reverberated throughout the seats of the new Opera House. You’d think the fine gentlemen and ladies of New York would have been more enthralled with the Faustian tragedy being played…

Helen McNicoll – The Mother (c. 1912)

When it comes to Impressionism and motherhood there’s probably no one more famous than American artist Mary Cassatt, whose touching vignettes of the mother-child relationship blossom in unassuming poses under the guide of cool, calculated brushstrokes. Berthe Morisot too, another Impressionist, tackled motherhood with tenderness and candor, returning to the subject of her daughter, Julie,…

A Room with a View: Gustave Caillebotte’s Paintings

I dwell in Possibility – A fairer House than Prose – More numerous of Windows – Superior – for Doors – Emily Dickinson It’s been a long year of repeated lockdowns and painfully drawn-out hours, when the only escape is looking out the window — anything to gain a break from the day and stop…

Claude Monet – Pont de l’Europe, Gare Saint-Lazare (1877)

When Georges-Eugène Haussmann, also known as Baron Haussmann, was assigned by Napoleon III to do a makeover of Paris in the mid-19th century, he was met with fierce opposition by the public. The expropriations en masse, the demolitions of entire neighborhoods and the tearing down of the Medieval, insalubrious, narrow streets, disrupted the daily lives…

Paul Gauguin – Self-Portrait with Portrait of Émile Bernard (1888)

Three friends. Three beards. Three paintings. In August 1888, a sensitive, anxious, yet quite ambitious 20-year-old man set out to walk by foot the more than 500 km distance between Paris and Pont-Aven, in order to paint with French artist Paul Gauguin. His beautiful younger sister, 17-year-old Madeleine, accompanied him. His name was Émile Bernard…

Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot – Lady in Blue (1874)

It was the autumn of 1909 when a curious Parisian crowd gathered at the Grand Palais to witness the unveiling of Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot’s decades long, well-kept secret. Thirty-four years had passed since the great French landscape artist had died, and much had happened in the meantime. Impressionism had changed the face of the art…