Ivan Shishkin – Rain in an Oak Forest (1891)

Given the monikers “Forest Tsar”, “Old Pine Tree” and “Lonely Oak” by his contemporaries, Ivan Shishkin enchanted everyone with his meticulous eye for detail and with his extraordinary skill in grasping the beauty and simplicity of nature. His highly realistic landscapes – usually rendering forests – belong to a larger movement at the time, called Peredvizhniki (The Itinerants), the Russian version of French realism.

By the 1890s, Shishkin had reached the height of his artistic development and some of his best works come from the last decade of his life. Rain in an Oak Forest is one such example, a landscape capturing the subtle and ephemeral effects of a spring drizzle. As always, the Russian returned to depict what he knew best: the forest – his sanctuary, his workshop.

Ivan Shishkin - Rain in an Oak Forest
Ivan Shishkin – Rain in an Oak Forest (1891), oil on canvas

Amongst tall, oak trees, a muddy path makes its way; it starts wide in the foreground and narrows sinuously towards the slightly tilted horizon line. On the path are a couple shielding from the rain under an umbrella and a man walking in front of them. We don’t usually hear this about other artists, but it was fellow painter Konstantin Savitsky who painted the silhouettes and not Shishkin himself.

While the rain can’t be seen, we do notice glimmering droplets hanging from the trees’ green foliage, sliding on the umbrella and rippling in the large puddle. In the background, a silvery haziness with golden tinges blurs the receding oak trees, masterfully seizing the play of light and color. It almost feels like we are right there, in the oak forest, breathing in the fresh scent of rain.

 

Related:

Nicholas Roerich – The Mount of Five Treasures (Two Worlds)

Martiros Sarian – Ararat and the Arch of Charents

6 thoughts on “Ivan Shishkin – Rain in an Oak Forest (1891)

    1. The haziness is my favorite part too, there’s something magical about it. It makes me think of a curtain of fine rain in the distance, but it could very well be the air changing its density.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Haha, funny you should say that. I used to have a reproduction of Shishkin in my living room, in my childhood home. Except that I didn’t know it was him… until a few months ago, when I started looking at more of his paintings.

      Like

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