Cagnaccio di San Pietro – Zoologia (1928)

Cagnacico di San Pietro (1897 – 1946), born Natale Bentivoglio Scarpa, was an Italian magic realist painter, heavily influenced by the German movement called New Objectivity. His paintings have a photographic air about them, making them look highly contemporaneous.

Zoologia (1928) is a classic example of the photorealistic style he employed. Even when showing erotic imagery, Cagnaccio makes it look more sinister than titillating. In Zoologia sex and violence are intertwined, with the implication that humans’ biological drives are no different than animals’. The book shown in the right lower corner, titled “Zoologia” gives the name of the painting, while also explaining what prompts the brutality of the sex scene, the animal instincts still lurking in our genetic tapestry.

Although it can’t be read in this particular image of the artwork, the authors listed on the book cover are Adam and Eve. Below the picture of a monkey, di San Pietro added “Edition revised and corrected by modern society”.

The man (who is none other than the painter himself) is pinning down the woman, who looks away, crossing her legs. She seems to be smiling: is she enjoying the irony or is she simply resigned? The man stares at her as if waiting for an answer.

Cagnaccio di San Pietro - Zoologia
Cagnaccio di San Pietro – Zoologia (1928), oil on canvas

3 thoughts on “Cagnaccio di San Pietro – Zoologia (1928)

  1. I love how you leave the write ups with open ended questions. I think that’s the way it should be too.
    I think I am going to develop a keener eye at paintings that I see from now on as well as the stories behind them.
    Thanks !

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s